Courses

UK COURSES RELATED TO APPALACHIAN STUDIES

 

SUMMER & FALL 2012   

SUMMER 2012 

APP 200  Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor: Catherine Herdman. Meets: On-line, First six weeks summer session. UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.  This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  

SOC 235 Inequalities in Society. Instructor: Shaunna Scott. Meets: Online, TBD. UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. Analysis of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequality in various societies. One of the five modules for this course focuses on Appalachia. Prereq: SOC 101 or RSO 102. (Same as AAS 235.)

APP 300 Development in Appalachia. Instructor: Amanda Fickey. Meets: MTWRF.  Time: 9:10 - 10:30 a.m.  Second six weeks summer session. The term “Appalachia” may be understood in multiple ways. While the term is often associated with various socio-economic and political meanings, it also refers to the remarkable physical geography of ancient mountains that created a diversity of distinctive ecologies. This course will focus on the dynamic interplay between these meanings, power, wealth, biodiversity and landscape in shaping the cultural, economic, political history, and geography of this region over the past 200 years. Major themes will revolve around local, state, and regional development policies and practices as well as the exploration of alternative economic and political spaces.

CLD 360 or SOC 360 Environmental Sociology.   Instructor:  John Johnson &  Lisa M. Conley; Meets:  On-line first six weeks summer session.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice.

CPH 601 Environmental Health.  Instructor:  TBD.  Meets:  On-line, first six weeks session.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

FALL 2012

CLD 102  The Dynamics of Rural Social Life.  Instructor:  Darryl Anthony Strode.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101.

CLD 260  Community Portraits.  Instructor:  Richard C Maurer.  Meets:  MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.  This course introduces the social science concept of community. The focus will be on definitions of community, and the different types of communities that exist in society. Students will gather and analyze information in real communities that represent different types of community.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor:  Ann Kingsolver, TA: Amanda Fickey. Meetings & Times: Lectures on MW 2:00-2:50 p.m. with various Wednesday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

ENS 200 Introduction to Environmental Studies. Instructor: Rebecca Claire Glasscock.  Meets: TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  A broad-ranging multidisciplinary introduction to current environmental issues and problem solving presented through a series of case studies. Case studies incorporate contemporary environmental themes including industrialization, resource use, and pollution; changing land use patterns; global warming and deforestation; biodiversity; political regulation; economic resources; cultural attitudes toward nature. Each case study will present environmental issues as scientific problems with social, political, philosophical, and economic causes and consequences. Emphasis is placed on understanding and combining different approaches to environmental problems and on proposing public policy solutions.

SOC 235-401 Inequalities in Society.  Instructor: Shaunna L Scott.  Meets: TR 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. Analysis of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequality in various societies. One of the five modules for this course focuses on Appalachia.

APP 300 Appalachian English.  Instructor:  Jennifer Cramer.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm -12:50 pm. This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication. Course may be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

A&S 300 International Perspectives on Refugees and Humanitarianism.  Instructor: Sasikumar Balasundaram.  Meets: TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  This course will allow undergraduate students across the College of Arts and Sciences to learn from an international scholar in his area of expertise on international refugees and humanitarian aid. The course will meet the requirement for a social science elective. It has also been approved as meeting the distribution requirements for International Studies majors in the areas of Human Rights & Social Movements, International Relations, International Development, and East, South, and Southeast Asia. 

MUS 301 Appalachian Music. Instructor: Ronald A Pen.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  A survey of musical genre and styles in the Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between African American and European American contributions.

LIN 317-001 Language and Society: Appalachian Linguistics. Instructor:  Jennifer S Cramer.  Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation, and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication.

SW 320 Global Poverty: Response Across Cultures.  Instructor: Marie-Antoinette Sossou.  Meets: TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  An examination of poverty in various non-Western cultures. The course will cover the nature, scope, and distribution of poverty, definitions of poverty, common characteristics of the poor, as well as cultural traditions and folkways which contribute to the problem. Social welfare responses and humanitarian efforts which address the problem are examined.

AEC 324-401   Agricultural Law.  Instructor: Clinton R Quarles. Meets: T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm.  A study of legislation, administrative regulations, constitutions and court cases that have economic ramifications on agricultural and rural life. Prereq: AEC 101.

SOC 340  Community Interaction.  Instructor:  Lorraine E Garkovich.  Meets:  MW 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm.  Examines community effects on group and individual behavior from the perspective of sociological social psychology. By focusing on individuals, individuals in groups, and groups, special emphasis is given to how community context shapes the attitudes, beliefs, and actions of individuals as well as their interactions with others. Prereq: CLD 102 or SOC 101 or consent of instructor. Primary registration access limited to SOC and CLD majors and remaining seats open during secondary registration.

CLD 360 or SOC 360 Environmental Sociology.  Instructor: Christopher S. Oliver.  Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice. 

AEC 424 Principles of Environmental Law.  Instructor: John K Schieffer.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.   Provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of United States environmental law. Addresses the framework of the American legal system as it applies to environmental regulation. Covers the sources of environmental law and reviews major federal environmental statutes and judicial decisions addressing specific issues.

PS 456G Appalachian Politics.  Instructor: Christopher Scott Rice.  Meets: MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.   A study of the interrelationships of the Southern Appalachian region and its people with the larger American political system, culture, and economy. Selective examination of public policies and major issues and their development in the politics of the region.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management.  Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  Lab Meets T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm.  Principles and techniques involved in forest watershed management as related to the water resource. The influence of forestry practices on water movement into and through the watershed; water storage; water loss, vegetation and water yields; water quality. All-day field trip required.

JOU 485 Community Journalism.  Instructor: Alvin Cross.  Meets W 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm.  A study of all aspects of small town and suburban newspapers, including editorial, advertising, circulation and management. Students will get the opportunity to do original reporting and research in Appalachian Kentucky.  This is an option available to individual students who demonstrate the ability to do the work and have the time to do the work in the field.  Travel support is provided.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours per week.  Interested students should see Instructor before enrolling Prereq: JOU/CLD 301.

AAS 523 (same as SW 523) Social Perspectives on Racism and Ethnic Prejudices in America. 2-3 credits. Instructor: Reiko Ozaki.  Meets: R 6:30 pm – 9:20 pm.  The course is designed to provide the knowledge needed in understanding the dynamics of institutional racism from a broader perspective of five specific ethnic minorities in rural and urban America. Particular emphasis is placed upon planned community change and strategies pertinent to minority group communities. Students who wish to make a special, in-depth study of one of the specified content areas may take this course for one additional credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EPE 525/773  Let’s See:  Approaching the History of Education through Photographs.  Instructor: Richard Angelo.  Meets: R 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm.  Open to beginning as well as advanced graduate students. Because it is a "seminar," the emphasis will be on original research. Alan Trachtenberg's Reading American Photographs: Images as History from Mathew Brady to Walker Evans (1989) is an early and outstanding example of what has become a burgeoning literature. Using appropriate secondary works as guide and inspiration, students will explore a topic of their choice that bears on history of education in Kentucky. The only requirement (aside from the final paper) is that the topic be rooted in one way or another in the photographic collections at our disposal here on campus or on line. (For a sample, see the "Brief Photo Essay on the History of Education in KY" on the EPE website: http://education.uky.edu/EPE/content/research-briefs).

CPH 601-001  Environmental Health.   Instructor:  Nancy E Johnson.  Meets: W 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CPH 601-201  Environmental Health.  Instructor:  TBD.   Meets in classroom & online.  See schedule book.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

ANT 637  Sociocultural Dimensions of Economic Development.  Instructor:  Hsain Ilahiane.  Meets:  M 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  This seminar examines anthropological and social science contributions to the understanding of development as well as the applications of social science knowledge in development programs. The course is designed to cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of development anthropology and to challenge students to think critically about development problems and processes.  Ideal for graduate students in agriculture, business, communications and information science, diplomacy, economics, geography, history, international development, political science, public health, and sociology.  For more information contact hsain.ilahiane@uky.edu or 859-257-6920. 

For more information, contact:
Ann Kingsolver, Director, Appalachian Studies Program.   
ann.kingsolver@uky.edu   
859-257-4852

Appalachian Center
University of Kentucky
624 Maxwelton Court
Lexington, KY 40506-0347                                                           
www.appalachiancenter.org

 

UK COURSES RELATED TO APPALACHIAN STUDIES, SPRING AND SUMMER 2012

SPRING 2012

Undergraduate

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor: Dwight Billings, TA: Catherine Herdman. Meetings & Times: Lectures on MW 2:00-2:50 p.m. with various Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society. It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life. We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

APP 300 Energy in Appalachia. Instructor: Jenrose Fitzgerald. Meets: TR. Time: 3:30-4:45 p.m. This course will critically examine diverse representations of Appalachia’s energy economy. Readings include a range of perspectives on the social, environmental, and economic implications of coal in the region, as well as on the potential of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other alternatives for diversifying the region’s energy portfolio in the 21st century. A central focus of the course will be the development of skills to help students critically analyze how energy issues in Appalachia are framed by differently positioned players, including journalists, scientists, engineers, social scientists, industry representatives, and environmental and social justice groups. The first half of the course will examine a range of perspectives on the coal industry and its impacts on Appalachian communities, and the second half of the course will focus on strategies for shaping the region’s energy future.

GWS 301-001 Crossroads of Gender, Class, and Race: Trashy Literature. Instructor: Carol Mason. Meets: TR. Time: 2:00-3:15 p.m. Have you ever been told, “Don’t read that trash”!? Have you ever heard someone being called “white trash”? This is a course that explores the cultural and political implications of such exclamations. We will read literature by and about people who are insensitively called white trash. A term we usually take for granted as a mean derision, “white trash” will serve as an analytical category as we read fiction exploring what it means to be working-class, poor, and white in twentieth-century America. We will contextualize the fiction in theories of class, gender, sex, and racialization, specifically the critical study of whiteness, and in regional history, including that of Appalachia.

ANT 352:003 North American Cultures. Instructor: Mary Anglin. Meets: TR. Time: 2:00-3:15 p.m. This course uses readings, films, and music to explore the plurality of peoples and cultures in North America—with particular attention to the US. We will look at youth cultures as sites of creativity and resistance, examine perennial problems in social equality, consider the similarities and differences between urban and rural ways of life, and explore environmental concerns as an integral part of making and sustaining culture. The goals of the course include gaining appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of cultures in North America, gaining awareness of and sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and understanding the distinctions between “race,” ethnicity, and racism. A number of the course readings are specifically Appalachia-focused.

APP 399 Appalachian Resource Sustainability Practicum. Instructor: Ann Kingsolver. Meets: Spring Break 2012. Sign up for one hour of APP 399 with Ann Kingsolver to enroll in this spring break service-learning course in Appalachian Kentucky. The entire course (1 credit hour, pass/fail) will be completed from March 11 to March 18 at the Robinson Forest facilities, which are part of UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability (http://www2.ca.uky.edu/rcars/) near Jackson, Kentucky. Students will learn about the history and future of natural resource use in the region including forestry, mining, and agriculture, with hands-on opportunities to work in a community garden, learn water quality testing techniques, and plan and carry out a small land reclamation project with an organization of young people in Magoffin County working toward sustainable livelihoods in the region. There will be interdisciplinary faculty participation from UK as well as opportunities to learn from discussions and activities with community members. Transportation, lodging, and meals will be available to the group as part of the course; each student’s individual share of the expenses for lodging and meals will be capped at no more than $200 for the week.

ENG 482 Appalachian Literature. Instructor: Erik Reece. Meets: TR. Time: 12:30-1:45 p.m. In this course, we will examine the very rich literature —fiction, nonfiction, poetry, film and music — that has come from the mountains of Appalachia. While the region of Appalachia stretches from Alabama to New York State, our emphasis will be on the literature of central Appalachia — mainly the work of writers from Kentucky and West Virginia.

Undergraduate/Graduate


A&S 500 Special Topics: Global Appalachia. Instructor: Ann Kingsolver. Meets: TR. Time: 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
In this course, we will examine the ways in which Appalachia has always had strong global connections, environmentally, economically, and culturally. We will critique isolationist discourse that has masked the shared concerns of those in Appalachia with other global regions that have been viewed as low-wage labor pools for transnational extractive industries, for example, and that have also contributed to collective knowledge about sustainable resource use and social capital. Appalachia’s global dimensions will be examined both historically and comparatively via topics ranging from local production of global commodities to migration, identity, changing land ownership, and community analyses and responses to the many processes discussed as globalization. The readings will include books by bell hooks, Roger Moody, Vandana Shiva, Eve Weinbaum, and other authors; required work will be different for undergraduate and graduate students.

GEO 509 GIS Workshop. Instructor: Matthew Wilson. Meets: TR. Time: 12:30-1:45 p.m. Geographic information technologies continue to drive the representation and management of complex as well as everyday spatial information. As a result, increasing numbers of for-profit and non-profit organizations have recognized the need to transform their information into a spatial format. The demand for collaborative and participatory skills in the use of these mapping tools has, of course, been furthered by this general trend. Therefore, the goal for this course is that each student will become an independent and effective GIS user while developing their collaborative skills in the use of GIS for spatial analysis and representation. To meet this goal, this course follows a participatory workshop model, drawing on Elwood (2009) -- an intensive, hands-on experience in which student teams use GIS in collaboration with community partners. These partnerships will involve students in a full range of collaborative GIS: working with team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analyses, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses. The lecture, reading, and seminar discussion components of the course will focus on topics important to collaborative development -- to be prepared to implement, manage, and apply in a variety of research and applications areas, and in multiple geographical and institutional contexts.

GWS 595-001: The Rural Queer. Instructor: Carol Mason. Meets: TR. Time: 11-00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. This advanced course explores how lesbian and gay historians and queer theorists have recently been theorizing the so-called rural queer. In addition to reading histories and ethnographies of actually existing GLBTQ people in rural communities, we will examine key concepts, cultural assumptions, and analytical categories that have come under scrutiny in the midst of recent scholarly inquiry. Among these are visibility, coming out, metronormativity, queer mobility, homonormativity, tolerance, and a variety of antigay concepts such as the ex-gay, the gay agenda, and the homosexual-as-terrorist. Our goal in examining these concepts is to map the scholarly inquiry into the rural queer – why such an inquiry arose and how it intersects with academic studies of globalization, critical regionalism, racial formation, social movements, and political rhetoric. This course is not recommended as a first course in sexuality studies.

CPH 644 Rural Health Disparities. Instructor: Robin Vanderpool. Meets: R. Time: 6-8:30. Through class meetings, course readings, video presentations, field experiences, and assignments, this course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of issues pertaining to health disparities of rural populations by examining current programs and policies, relevant literature, public health practice, and quantitative and qualitative research pertaining to the health and well-being of rural populations. Many of the discussions and field experiences are Appalachia-based. No prerequisites.

Graduate

MUS 702 Musicology Seminar: American Sacred Music Expression. Instructor: Ron Pen. Meets: W. Time: 3:30-6:00 p.m. Study and research in specific musicological problems. Music of the Appalachian region will be included in the content of the course, and student projects may be related to sacred music of Appalachia. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

SOC 735 Seminar in Social Inequalities: Inequality in Appalachia. Instructor: Dwight Billings. Meets: T. Time: 7:00-9:30 p.m. This course is an elective in the Sociology Department’s program in Social Inequalities. While it is organized by a sociological framework, it is also intended to serve as a graduate level introduction to multidisciplinary scholarship in Appalachian Studies. We will examine a few “classic” and mostly recent studies to explore interpretive shifts, controversies, and debates in Appalachian Studies, especially as they relate to the study of race, class, and gender. Topics will include Appalachia’s discursive formation (its “discovery” in the late nineteenth century), the construction of “tradition,” controversies over the politics of culture, interpretations of the region’s social history and development, and other topics such as poverty, globalization, politics and activism, healthcare, religion, and the environment including mountaintop removal coal mining. A sub-theme will focus on the relationships between Appalachian Studies and other critical cultural studies including post-colonialism, subaltern studies, and the intersectionality of inequalities. Among the goals of the course will be to provide a context for the critical assessment of new works in Appalachian Studies as well as the space to begin work on a publishable or presentable paper in the field that might be submitted to for presentation at the Appalachian Studies annual conference or conferences in students’ home disciplines. In addition to works in sociology, we will read new contributions to Appalachian studies of inequality from Anthropology, English, Education, History, Geography, and Political Science.

SUMMER 2012

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor: Catherine Herdman. Meets: On-line, First six weeks summer session. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society. It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life. We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

SOC 235 Inequalities in Society. Instructor: Shaunna Scott. Meets: Online, TBD. Analysis of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequality in various societies. One of the five modules for this course focuses on Appalachia. Prereq: SOC 101 or RSO 102. (Same as AAS 235.)

APP 300 Development in Appalachia. Instructor: Amanda Fickey. Meets: On Campus, Second six weeks summer session. The term “Appalachia” may be understood in multiple ways. While the term is often associated with various socio-economic and political meanings, it also refers to the remarkable physical geography of ancient mountains that created a diversity of distinctive ecologies. This course will focus on the dynamic interplay between these meanings, power, wealth, biodiversity and landscape in shaping the cultural, economic, political history, and geography of this region over the past 200 years. Major themes will revolve around local, state, and regional development policies and practices as well as the exploration of alternative economic and political spaces.

For more information, contact:
Ann Kingsolver, Director, Appalachian Studies Program.
ann.kingsolver@uky.edu

859-257-4852

Appalachian Center

University of Kentucky

624 Maxwelton Court

Lexington, KY 40506-0347

www.appalachiancenter.org

 

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